Bacteriology of Sinusitis in the Immunocompromised Hosts

Sinusitis occurs in a wide range of immunocompromised hosts including neutropenics, diabetics, patients in critical care units, and patients infected with HIV.

Fungal and P. aeruginosa are the most common forms of sinusitis in neutropenic patients. Aspergillus spp. is frequently the causative organism, although mucor, rhizopus, alternaria, and other molds have been implicated (50). Fungi and S. aureus, streptococci and gram-negative enterics are the most common isolates in diabetics (51). The organisms most commonly isolated in nosocomial sinusitis are gram-negative enteric bacteria (such as P. aeruginosa, K. pneumoniae, Enterobacteriaceae, P. mirabilis, and S. marcescens) streptococci and staphylococci (52) and anaerobic bacteria (53). The causative organisms in patients with HIV infection included P. aeruginosa, S. aureus, streptococci, anaerobes, and fungi (Aspergillus, Cryptococcus, and Rhizopus) (54). Refractory parasitic sinusitis caused by Microsporidium, Cryptosporidium, and Acanthamoeba has also been described in these with advanced immunosuppression. Other etiologic agents include cytomegalovirus, atypical mycobacteria, and Mycobacterium kansasii (47).

Diabetes 2

Diabetes 2

Diabetes is a disease that affects the way your body uses food. Normally, your body converts sugars, starches and other foods into a form of sugar called glucose. Your body uses glucose for fuel. The cells receive the glucose through the bloodstream. They then use insulin a hormone made by the pancreas to absorb the glucose, convert it into energy, and either use it or store it for later use. Learn more...

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