The Link Between Oxidative Stress and Vascular Damage in Diabetes

We currently lack good measures of oxidative stress and oxidative damage in human Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes specific studies to make a definitive decision as to whether oxidative stress is increased in diabetes per se, or in relationship to its vascular complications. Once an appropriate measure, or more likely panel of

Hyperglycemia Dyslipidemia Renal impairment

Hyperglycemia Dyslipidemia Renal impairment

ATHEROSCLEROSIS

Fig. 7.1 Schema of risk factors and mechanisms for accelerated atherosclerosis in diabetes

ATHEROSCLEROSIS

Fig. 7.1 Schema of risk factors and mechanisms for accelerated atherosclerosis in diabetes measures, are validated and standardized, a reference range in healthy non-diabetic subjects over a wide age range must be determined. Oxidative stress and damage damage-related levels can then be compared in well well-characterized Type 1 and Type 2 diabetic subjects with and without micro- and macrovascular complications, over a range of glycemic control, and with known lifestyle (e.g., smoking) and medications (which may have antioxidant activity). Based on current knowledge, oxidative stress is likely to be increased in some parts of some cells in some tissues, for at least some of the time. Even if oxidative stress, an inevitable part of living, is not increased in diabetes per se, then it may still contribute to the progression of vascular complications of diabetes. A simple schema is suggested (Figure 7.1) .

Thus, it remains conceivable that, even if not increased in diabetes, lowering oxidative stress and oxidative damage may reduce vascular complications in diabetes, in the same way that lowering supposedly 'normal' levels of cholesterol has resulted in further reduction of vascular events in at-risk groups. Much further (long-term human based) research is required to prove this.

Diabetes 2

Diabetes 2

Diabetes is a disease that affects the way your body uses food. Normally, your body converts sugars, starches and other foods into a form of sugar called glucose. Your body uses glucose for fuel. The cells receive the glucose through the bloodstream. They then use insulin a hormone made by the pancreas to absorb the glucose, convert it into energy, and either use it or store it for later use. Learn more...

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