Molecular Genetics of Cancer Syndromes

. . . some combinations of genes yield bodies that are much more prone than others to break out into that unregulated growth that is called cancer.

H. S.Jennings (1868-1947)

Cancer is a disease of growth (sometimes visible; more characteristically, inside), of abnormal, ultimately lethal growth that is measured, incessant, steady.

Susan Sontag (1933-2004)

. . . Cancer's a funny thing. Nobody knows what the cause is, Though some pretend they do; It's like some hidden assassin Waiting to strike at you.

FEW diseases cause as MUCH DREAD and grief as cancer. Everyone knows someone who has died of cancer. A university professor at the prime of his career has blurred vision and headaches, goes to the doctor, is diagnosed with a brain cancer, glioblastoma, and despite therapy dies within two years. A tennis player is unusually fatigued, goes to the doctor, is diagnosed with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), and although therapy prolongs his life, he dies nine years after onset of the cancer. A mother feels a continual soreness in the abdominal region, goes to the doctor, is diagnosed with liver cancer, which probably arose from a previous bout with breast cancer, and dies within a month. The most frightening aspect of cancer is that it begins suddenly and by chance in outwardly healthy individuals. Despite the pall that cancer spreads, many patients respond to treatment and have lifelong remissions.

Explanations for the apparent upsurge in cases of cancer in the twentieth century are controversial. Cancer certainly is not a new disease; therefore, increased awareness may be the result of better and more definitive diagnoses. And, as infectious diseases have decreased and life spans lengthened, it has become increasingly likely that more people will live to develop some sort of cancer. Environmental pollutants and lifestyle choices, such as cigarette smoking, contribute significantly to the occurrence of cancer. However, many cancers arise without any obvious contributory determinants. In some of these

An Introduction to Human Molecular Genetics, Second Edition, by Jack J. Pasternak ISBN 0-471-47426-6 Copyright © 2005 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Regulation of the Cell Division Cycle

Apoptosis: Programmed Cell Death

Tumor Metastasis

Oncogenes

Alteration of Oncogenes in Cancer Cells

Tumor Suppressor Genes

Regulation of the Cell Division Cycle

Apoptosis: Programmed Cell Death

Tumor Metastasis

Oncogenes

Alteration of Oncogenes in Cancer Cells

Tumor Suppressor Genes

10 Ways To Fight Off Cancer

10 Ways To Fight Off Cancer

Learning About 10 Ways Fight Off Cancer Can Have Amazing Benefits For Your Life The Best Tips On How To Keep This Killer At Bay Discovering that you or a loved one has cancer can be utterly terrifying. All the same, once you comprehend the causes of cancer and learn how to reverse those causes, you or your loved one may have more than a fighting chance of beating out cancer.

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