Foley Catheter For Infant

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Umbilical Artery Catheter
Figure 7.43. Discoloration with gangrene of the right buttock following umbilical artery catheter placement.
Figure 7.44. The same infant 10 days later showed marked improvement of the buttock.

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Artery Vein Buttocks

Figure 7.45. Gangrene of the left buttock following umbilical artery catherization. The umbilical artery catheter was positioned in the iliac artery radiographical-ly. There is a well-known association between injection of medications into the umbilical artery and necrosis and gangrene of the buttock and sciatic nerve palsy.

Figure 7.46. The same infant with unilateral gangrene of the buttock also had a sciatic nerve palsy as a result of the umbilical catheter being positioned in the iliac artery. Note the "foot drop."

Figure 7.47. Radiograph of the lower extremities in an infant with leg length discrepancy. The soft tissue mass and bone growth of the left leg are decreased in comparison to the right. These postnatal changes were the result of femoral artery thrombosis after umbilical artery catheter placement.

Figure 7.46. The same infant with unilateral gangrene of the buttock also had a sciatic nerve palsy as a result of the umbilical catheter being positioned in the iliac artery. Note the "foot drop."

Figure 7.47. Radiograph of the lower extremities in an infant with leg length discrepancy. The soft tissue mass and bone growth of the left leg are decreased in comparison to the right. These postnatal changes were the result of femoral artery thrombosis after umbilical artery catheter placement.

Figure 7.48. Placement of an umbilical artery catheter was difficult in this infant. On the first and second attempts the catheter went down each leg. On the third attempt the catheter was placed in the aorta. It remained in place for 4 hours when blood was noted in the urine and the legs were both noted to have some discol-oration.This figure shows the status 19 hours after the catheter was removed. The infant continued to improve.

Figure 7.48. Placement of an umbilical artery catheter was difficult in this infant. On the first and second attempts the catheter went down each leg. On the third attempt the catheter was placed in the aorta. It remained in place for 4 hours when blood was noted in the urine and the legs were both noted to have some discol-oration.This figure shows the status 19 hours after the catheter was removed. The infant continued to improve.

Foley Catheter For Infant

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