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Figure 7.33. Chest and abdominal radiograph of an infant after placement of an umbilical venous catheter. Note the placement of the catheter in the liver with air outlining the portal venous system.

Figure 7.31. Anteroposterior and lateral radiographic views of an umbilical venous catheter placed high in the heart. It is possible to sample oxygenated left atrial blood when the catheter passes across the patent foramen ovale.

Figure 7.32. Anteroposterior and lateral radiographic views of an infant with an umbilical venous catheter placed in the left pulmonary artery. The previous figure and this figure stress the importance of checking placement of umbilical catheters following their insertion. When they are placed in such abnormal positions they should be withdrawn.

Figure 7.33. Chest and abdominal radiograph of an infant after placement of an umbilical venous catheter. Note the placement of the catheter in the liver with air outlining the portal venous system.

Figure 7.34. Autopsy specimen of the umbilical vessels with umbilical vein perforation from a catheter during umbilical vein placement.

Figure 7.34. Autopsy specimen of the umbilical vessels with umbilical vein perforation from a catheter during umbilical vein placement.

Figure 7.35. Anteroposterior and lateral radiographs in an infant showing an umbilical artery catheter which is placed high in the thoracic aorta curving on itself.

Figure 7.36. Anteroposterior and lateral radiographs of the same infant showing repositioning of the umbilical artery catheter after its initial high aortic placement. These follow-up films show the location of die catheter in the superior mesenteric artery. The infant developed abdominal distention and vomiting and had a large segment of gangrenous bowel which was removed.

Figure 7.35. Anteroposterior and lateral radiographs in an infant showing an umbilical artery catheter which is placed high in the thoracic aorta curving on itself.

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