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Figure 5.25. In this infant note the asymmetry of the nostrils and ecchymosis due to a dislocation of the triangular cartilage of the nasal septum, which may occur during delivery, especially if the mother has a prominent sacral promontory. When the septum is manually moved toward the midline the asymmetry persists confirming the dislocation. These infants require an otolaryngology evaluation.

Figure 5.26. Note the subcostal depression on either side of the xiphoid in an infant who was a breech presentation.

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Figure 5.27. This figure shows die same infant with bodi knees fitting well into die depressions. This is a fairly common example of a "position-of-comfort" deformity.

Figure 5.28. Another example of a positional deformity on both sides of the subcostal area resulting from position in utero in a breech presentation. This should not be confused with subcostal retraction in this premature infant who had respiratory distress.

Figure 5.29. In this infant the chest appears to be narrow compared with the rest of the body.

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Figure 5.30. The same infant shows the arms lying along side the chest wall compressing the thorax. This is a fairly common postural deformity and should not be confused with a narrow thorax observed in cases of dwarfism.

Figure 5.29. In this infant the chest appears to be narrow compared with the rest of the body.

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