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Figure 5.45. In this infant with talipes calcaneovalgus, note the marked dorsiflexion of the foot which is lying against the anterior part of the leg. Talipes calcaneo-valgus may occur as a result of abnormal intrauterine posture or may be associated with lower motor neuron defects such as spina bifida. Spontaneous correction usually occurs. This anomaly is more common in babies born in the breech position, especially if the knees were flexed in utero.

Figure 5.45. In this infant with talipes calcaneovalgus, note the marked dorsiflexion of the foot which is lying against the anterior part of the leg. Talipes calcaneo-valgus may occur as a result of abnormal intrauterine posture or may be associated with lower motor neuron defects such as spina bifida. Spontaneous correction usually occurs. This anomaly is more common in babies born in the breech position, especially if the knees were flexed in utero.

Figure 5.46. The same infant showing the flattening of the dorsum of the foot and marked concavity of the lateral side of the ankle joint.

Figure 5.47. An infant with severe talipes calcaneovalgus with marked bowing of the tibia and fibula. Osseous changes such as these are uncommon. This infant required surgical correction.

Figure 5.48. Radiograph of the same infant showing the marked bowing of the distal ends of the tibia and fibula.

Figure 5.47. An infant with severe talipes calcaneovalgus with marked bowing of the tibia and fibula. Osseous changes such as these are uncommon. This infant required surgical correction.

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