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Figure 5.2. A close-up of the postural deformities involving the feet.

Figure 5.1. The infant in the following five figures was referred to hospital with a diagnosis of multiple congenital malformations. It should be noted that these "malformations" represent examples of congenital postural deformities. Note the position of the hands, lower extremities and the feet occurring as a result of this infant's position in utero.

Figure 5.2. A close-up of the postural deformities involving the feet.

Figure 5.3. This figure demonstrates the congenital postural scoliosis and pseudo "wrist-drop."

Figure 5.4. This figure of the same infant shows a skin dimple over the left hip. Skin dimples are not uncommon in association with deformations (postural deformities or "position-of-comfort" deformities).

Figure 5.5. The infant has been placed into her in utero position. This demonstrates clearly how the above changes occurred as a result of the infant's "position-of-com-fort" in utero. If placed in a normal position, infants with deformations will be uncomfortable and will cry, but will quiet down rapidly when allowed to return to their "position-of-comfort."

Figure 5.6. Abdominal pregnancy is associated with multiple congenital postural deformities as there is no cushion of amniotic fluid.

Figure 5.5. The infant has been placed into her in utero position. This demonstrates clearly how the above changes occurred as a result of the infant's "position-of-com-fort" in utero. If placed in a normal position, infants with deformations will be uncomfortable and will cry, but will quiet down rapidly when allowed to return to their "position-of-comfort."

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