What Does A Infants Vagina Look Like

Figure 3.104. A CT scan of an infant with a grade II PVH-IVH. There is blood within the lateral ventricles without ventricular dilatation.

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Figure 3.105. A CT scan of an infant with a grade III PVH-IVH. There is blood within the dilated lateral ventricles.

Figure 3.106. A CT scan of an infant with a grade IV PVH-IVH. Note the blood within the lateral ventricles and extension into the cerebral parenchyma.

Figure 3.107. This term infant presented with marked increase in head size (fronto-occipital circumference 41 cm). A lateral skull radiograph showed die enlarged head and an increased density over the parietal area.

Figure 3.108. A CT scan of the same infant showed a large brain tumor. The infant died at the age of 2 days and autopsy diagnosis was glioblastoma multiforme. There was hydrocephalus and a massive brain tumor with diffuse encephalomalacia and marked distortion of the brain.

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The presentation of congenital brain tumors includes:

  1. Stillborn with megalencephaly, with tumor replacing nearly all of the brain.
  2. Liveborn with dystocia secondary to hydrocephalus.
  3. Normal at birth but with abrupt cranial enlargement within a few days.

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Figure 3.109. This term infant, born by spontaneous vaginal delivery, developed seizures on the first day of life and was treated with phenobarbital. The EEG showed decreased activity of the left temporal region. The fronto-occipital circumference increased rapidly in the first few days of life from 38.5 cm at birth to 41 cm at 10 days of age. Note the enlargement of the head and the illusion of low-set rotated ears.

Figure 3.110. A CT scan of the same infant revealed a large choroid plexus tumor. These tumors are usually associated with hydrocephalus. Hydrocephalus may occur as a result of an increased production of CSF or may be due to obstruction of the flow of CSF. A rapid increase in the size of the tumor or hydrocephalus may be associated with hemorrhage and necrosis in the tumor as occurred in this infant.

Figure 3.111. MRI of the same infant on the 9th day of life revealed a large mass on the right side extending to the midline with ventricular dilatation and hydrocephalus. The infant died at 31 days of age.

Infant Vagina

Figure 3.112. There was marked lack of fetal movement, vaginal delivery was difficult, and there was a fracture of the left humerus and of the right femur present at birth in this floppy term infant. Note the "frog leg" position with marked hypotonia, areflexia, and paradoxical respiration. The diagnosis was amyotonia congenita.

Figure 3.112. There was marked lack of fetal movement, vaginal delivery was difficult, and there was a fracture of the left humerus and of the right femur present at birth in this floppy term infant. Note the "frog leg" position with marked hypotonia, areflexia, and paradoxical respiration. The diagnosis was amyotonia congenita.

Figure 3.113. Posterior view of the same infant. Note again the hypotonia and the "frog leg" position with swelling of the left arm and the right leg. This swelling is the result of fractures at the time of birth.

Figure 3.114. Radiograph of the same infant. Note the very thin bones, lack of muscle tissue, and fracture of the left humerus and right femur.

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Figure 3.115. Radiograph of the right arm of the same infant shown in Figure 3.112-3.114. Note the marked thinning of the bones and lack of muscle mass. This poor development of bone and muscle results from lack of fetal movement.
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  • marco
    What does a infants vagina look like?
    5 months ago

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