Info

'This table was updated In March 2005. It Is not exhaustive. Infectious substances, including new or emerging pathogens, that do not appear In the table but that meet the same criteria

must be assigned to Category A. In addition, If there is doubt as to whether a substance meets the criteria it must be Included In Categoiy A

Figure 4-14 A, The Bio-Pouch (lower right-hand corner) is made of laminated, low-density polyethylene, which is virtually unbreakable. The label for shipping a diagnostic specimen is shown (UN 3373). B, The Bio-Bottle is made of high-density polyethylene and is used as the secondary container. This packaging is used for both infectious substances (with the Class 6 label shown) or for clinical and diagnostic specimens with the UN 3373 label. (Courtesy Air Sea Containers, Inc, Miami, Florida.)

Figure 4-14 A, The Bio-Pouch (lower right-hand corner) is made of laminated, low-density polyethylene, which is virtually unbreakable. The label for shipping a diagnostic specimen is shown (UN 3373). B, The Bio-Bottle is made of high-density polyethylene and is used as the secondary container. This packaging is used for both infectious substances (with the Class 6 label shown) or for clinical and diagnostic specimens with the UN 3373 label. (Courtesy Air Sea Containers, Inc, Miami, Florida.)

Infectious specimens or isolates should be wrapped with absorbent material and placed within a plastic biohazard bag, called a primary receptacle. The primary receptacle is then inserted into a secondary container, most often a watertight hard plastic mailer. After the secondary container is capped, it is placed in an outer tertiary container constructed of fiberboard. This type of packaging is shown in Figure 4-14, B. A UN Class 6 label on the outer box confirms that the packaging meets all the required standards. A Shippers Declaration for Dangerous Goods Form must accompany the airbill or ground form. Diagnostic or clinical specimens are packaged similarly but a UN3373 label is attached to a different outer box and it is not necessary to fill out a Shippers Declaration.

Shippers should note that some carriers have additional requirements for coolant materials such as ice, dry ice, or liquid nitrogen. Because the shipper is liable for appropriate packaging, it is best to check with individual carriers in special circumstances and update your instructions yearly when the new IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations are published.

Shipping and packaging regulations from the Code of Federal Regulations can be found at http://hazmat.dot.gov and http://www.cdc.gov/od/ohs/ biosfty/shipregs.htm. IATA regulations can be found at http://www.iata.org. The international importation or exportation of biological agents requires a permit from CDC. Information on obtaining a permit may be found at http://cdcgov.

  1. Blaser MJ, Feldman RA: Acquisition of typhoid fever from proficiency testing specimens, N Engl J Med 303:1481,1980.
  2. Eyre JWH: Bactériologie technique, Philadelphia, 1913, WB Saunders.

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Bacterial Vaginosis Facts

Bacterial Vaginosis Facts

This fact sheet is designed to provide you with information on Bacterial Vaginosis. Bacterial vaginosis is an abnormal vaginal condition that is characterized by vaginal discharge and results from an overgrowth of atypical bacteria in the vagina.

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