Mnc

Figure 50-16 This calcofluor white stain of sputum shows the intracellular yeast cells (arrows) of H. capsulalum, which are 2 to 5 nm in diameter.

the identification need not be attempted if the dimorphic fungi have been ruled out or if the clinician believes that the organism is not clinically significant. Ideally, all laboratories should identify all fungi recovered from f

Figure 50-17 This periodic acid-Schiff stain of exudate shows the cigar-to-oval-shaped yeast cells (arrows) of S. schenckii.

Figure 50-18 This potassium hydroxide preparation of pleural fluid shows the encapsulated, variably sized, spherical yeast cells (arrow) of C. neoformans. Phase-contrast microscopy.

clinical specimens; however, the limits of practicality and economic considerations play a definite role tn making a decision as to how far to go with their identification. Each individual laboratory director, in consul?

Figure 50-22 The deeply staining bodies in this mouse testis are the yeast forms of Sporothrix schenckii.

Figure 50-21 This potassium hydroxide preparation of sputum demonstrates two spherules of C. immitis filled with endospores. When these lie adjacent to each other they may be mistaken for B. dermatiiidis. Bright field microscopy.

Figure 50-23 Sclerotic bodies from the tissue of a patient with chromoblastomycosis (400x). (From Velasquez LF, Restrepo A: Sabouraudia 13:1,1975.)

Figure 50-19 This potassium hydroxide preparation of exudate shows a large budding yeast cell with a distinct broad base (arrow) between the cells, which is characteristic of B. dermatitidis. Phase-contrast microscopy.

Figure 50-21 This potassium hydroxide preparation of sputum demonstrates two spherules of C. immitis filled with endospores. When these lie adjacent to each other they may be mistaken for B. dermatiiidis. Bright field microscopy.

Figure 50-22 The deeply staining bodies in this mouse testis are the yeast forms of Sporothrix schenckii.

Figure 50-20 This auramine-rhodamine preparation of specimen material from a bone lesion demonstrates the characteristic broad-based budding yeast cell (arrow) of Blastomyces dermatitidis.

Figure 50-23 Sclerotic bodies from the tissue of a patient with chromoblastomycosis (400x). (From Velasquez LF, Restrepo A: Sabouraudia 13:1,1975.)

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Bacterial Vaginosis Facts

Bacterial Vaginosis Facts

This fact sheet is designed to provide you with information on Bacterial Vaginosis. Bacterial vaginosis is an abnormal vaginal condition that is characterized by vaginal discharge and results from an overgrowth of atypical bacteria in the vagina.

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